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        <a class="link" href= "index.html"> Back to Home </a>  
       <h1>Textbook Pages</h1>
        
    <h2>The Revolutionary War </h2>
            <h3>Leading Generals</h3>
<img src = "https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b6/Gilbert_Stuart_Williamstown_Portrait_of_George_Washington.jpg/1200px-Gilbert_Stuart_Williamstown_Portrait_of_George_Washington.jpg" alt  align="right"=  "ESSS" height="110"> <img src 
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George Washington was brought into the world a Virginian rancher yet would before long be rising the positions as a splendid military pioneer in numerous wars. Washington demonstrated to be a superior general than military strategist. His quality lay not in his virtuoso on the front line but rather in his capacity to keep the battling pioneer armed force together. His troops were ineffectively prepared and needed sustenance, ammo and different supplies (officers some of the time even abandoned shoes in winter). Be that as it may, Washington had the option to provide them the guidance and inspiration to continue onward.
<img src = "http://i1.wp.com/americanmilitaryhistorypodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/william_howe.jpg" alt  align="left"=  "ESSS" height="110"> 

<p>
William Howe served under James Wolfe at Quebec in 1759, drove British powers at Bunker Hill in 1775 and succeeded Thomas Gage as president in America. Working with his sibling, Rear Admiral Richard Howe, he drove effective strikes on Long Island, White Plains, and Forts Washington and Lee. Indeed, even in triumph, in any case, Howe was the subject of analysis. His inability to block American powers moving over the East River from Long Island to Manhattan in August 1776 is viewed by numerous individuals as a botched chance to carry an early end to the contention. In 1777, Howe vanquished Washington at Brandywine and got away from a snare at Germantown before moving into Philadelphia for the winter. 

Howe's lead in Philadelphia has been the subject of impressive examination. He had brought his special lady from Boston, Mrs. Elizabeth Loring, the alluring spouse of Loyalist Joshua Loring Jr., a store of detainees. Mr. Loring appeared to be alright with the game plan as long as he kept his rewarding arrangement. Howe was entirely reprimanded for proceeding of appreciate the joys of Philadelphia instead of go ahead with the threats. 

Howe was not a clumsy military pioneer. He did, in any case, stick longer than others to an old fashioned origination of fighting, leaning toward the more seasoned European methodology. Howe's choice to proceed onward Philadelphia instead of join General Burgoyne in 1777 may have been the unequivocal choice of the war. He was expelled from his order in 1778 for Sir Henry Clinton.
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  <h2>
    The Battles
    </h2>

    <ol>
  <li>Battle of Lexington and Conord</li> 
  <li>Battle of Saratoga</li>
  <li>Battle of Yorktown</li>
</ol>
  
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  <h2>
The Resolution
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    <p>
By the fall of 1781, Greene’s American forces had managed to force Cornwallis and his men to withdraw to Virginia’s Yorktown peninsula, near where the York River empties into Chesapeake Bay. Supported by a French army commanded by General Jean Baptiste de Rochambeau, Washington moved against Yorktown with a total of around 14,000 soldiers, while a fleet of 36 French warships offshore prevented British reinforcement or evacuation. Trapped and overpowered, Cornwallis was forced to surrender his entire army on October 19. Claiming illness, the British general sent his deputy, Charles O’Hara, to surrender; after O’Hara approached Rochambeau to surrender his sword (the Frenchman deferred to Washington), Washington gave the nod to his own deputy, Benjamin Lincoln, who accepted it.
Though the movement for American independence effectively triumphed at Yorktown, contemporary observers did not see that as the decisive victory yet. British forces remained stationed around Charleston, and the powerful main army still resided in New York. Though neither side would take decisive action over the better part of the next two years, the British removal of their troops from Charleston and Savannah in late 1782 finally pointed to the end of the conflict. British and American negotiators in Paris signed preliminary peace terms in Paris late that November, and on September 3, 1783, Great Britain formally recognized the independence of the United States in the Treaty of Paris. At the same time, Britain signed separate peace treaties with France and Spain (which had entered the conflict in 1779), bringing the American Revolution to a close after eight long years.
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