How To Make A True Coding Language: Part 1
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CSharpIsGud (798)

Im making this tutorial series because almost every language i've seen posted to repl talk doesn't use parsing algorithms and I think it would be nice to see some that do. There are a couple flavors of these languages, typically they come in 2 forms
1) They use string splitting and regular expressions

Technically you can call this "parsing" or a language of some sort.
But you will very quickly discover you run into syntax limitations like having to have a separator for a lot of things.
Example:
set:var,Hello World;print:var

2) They do nothing at all but define some classes or variables

I don't know how people get away with this and then tell you to calm down when someone calmly separates what it is from what it isn't. Even when put in the best possible words as to not directly attack the repl itself.

Which is why I have decided to create a tutorial on making a programming language in hopes people start making ones that don't have the above flaws.

This tutorial is going to go bottom to top using no dependencies at all and will show creation of a lexer all the way up to the hand made recursive-descent parser!

The Lexer (or scanner, tokenizer, whatever you wish to call it)

Located in lexer.py

The other components will get their own files as they are created.

Next: https://repl.it/talk/learn/How-To-Make-A-Language-Parsing/39832

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xxpertHacker (606)

@CSharpIsGud That's it, it ends there. Interfaces are for type checking, types are for type checking, what it calls "function overloading" is the stupidest implementation of function overloading I've ever seen, is just for type checking, templates are just for type checking.

All it is, is JS with types.

Dart has types too, and a whole different syntax, but there's more that syntax and types that make a language unique. Until TS really branches off from JS, it's still just a dialect. It doesn't add anything new.

Whereas, like I said before, Dart has a whole browser dedicated to running it, parsing it, etc. Look at TypeScript, Deno, one of the only TypeScript run-times that I've heard of, barely came out a few months ago.